thedailywhat:

Nostalgia Overload of the Day: Every Thing On It, a collection of never-before-published poems and drawings by the late, great Shel “Uncle Shelby” Silverstein, was released today via HarperCollins.
The book includes 145 poems, including the bittersweet “Years From Now,” which reads: “Although I cannot see your face / As you flip these poems awhile / Somewhere from some far-off place / I hear you laughing—and I smile.”
[nprfreshair.]

thedailywhat:

Nostalgia Overload of the Day: Every Thing On It, a collection of never-before-published poems and drawings by the late, great Shel “Uncle Shelby” Silverstein, was released today via HarperCollins.

The book includes 145 poems, including the bittersweet “Years From Now,” which reads: “Although I cannot see your face / As you flip these poems awhile / Somewhere from some far-off place / I hear you laughing—and I smile.”

[nprfreshair.]

(via thedailywhat)

Just got this tonight. I love this poem.

embroidery for a friend.

embroidery for a friend.

IT’S DARK IN HERE

I am writing these poems
From inside a lion,
And it’s rather dark in here.
So please excuse the handwriting
Which may not be too clear.
But this afternoon by the lion’s cage
I’m afraid I got too near.
And I’m writing these lines
From inside a lion,
And it’s rather dark in here.

Tags: falling up

CLOONY THE CLOWN

I’ll tell you the story of Cloony the Clown
Who worked in a circus that came through town.
His shoes were too big and his hat was too small,
But he just wasn’t, just wasn’t funny at all.
He had a trombone to play loud silly tunes,
He had a green dog and a thousand balloons.
He was floppy and sloppy and skinny and tall,
But he just wasn’t, just wasn’t funny at all.
And every time he did a trick,
Everyone felt a little sick.
And every time he told a joke,
Folks sighed as if their hearts were broke.
And every time he lost a shoe,
Everyone looked awfully blue.
And every time he stood on his head,
Everyone screamed, “Go back to bed!”
And every time he made a leap,
Everybody fell asleep.
And every time he ate his tie,
Everyone began to cry.
And Cloony could not make any money
Simply because he was not funny.
One day he said, “I’ll tell this town
How it feels to be an unfunny clown.”
And he told them all why he looked so sad,
And he told them all why he felt so bad.
He told of Pain and Rain and Cold,
He told of Darkness in his soul,
And after he finished his tale of woe,
Did everyone cry? Oh no, no, no,
They laughed until they shook the trees
With “Hah-Hah-Hahs” and “Hee-Hee-Hees.”
They laughed with howls and yowls and shrieks,
They laughed all day, they laughed all week,
They laughed until they had a fit,
They laughed until their jackets split.
The laughter spread for miles around
To every city, every town,
Over mountains, ‘cross the sea,
From Saint Tropez to Mun San Nee.
And soon the whole world rang with laughter,
Lasting till forever after,
While Cloony stood in the circus tent,
With his head drooped low and his shoulders bent.
And he said,”THAT IS NOT WHAT I MEANT -
I’M FUNNY JUST BY ACCIDENT.”
And while the world laughed outside.
Cloony the Clown sat down and cried.

being a fan of Shel and Apple products, this rocks. 

being a fan of Shel and Apple products, this rocks. 

DANNY O’DARE

Danny O’Dare, the dancin’ bear,
Ran away from the County Fair,
Ran right up to my back stair
And thought he’d do some dancin’ there.
He started jumpin’ and skippin’ and kickin’,
He did a dance called the Funky Chicken,
He did the Polka, he did the Twist,
He bent himself into a pretzel like this.
He did the Dog and the Jitterbug,
He did the Jerk and the Bunny Hug.
He did the Waltz and the Boogaloo,
He did the Hokey-Pokey too.
He did the Bop and the Mashed Potata,
He did the Split and the See Ya Later.
And now he’s down upon one knee,
Bowin’ oh so charmingly,
And winkin’ and smilin’—it’s easy to see
Danny O’Dare wants to dance with me

SMART

 My dad gave me one dollar bill
'Cause I'm his smartest son, 
And I swapped it for two shiny quarters
'Cause two is mroe than one! 

And then i took the quarters
And traded them to Lou
For three dimes-i guess he don’t know
that three is mroe than two! 

Just them, along came old blind Bates
And just ‘cause he can’t see
He gave me four nickels for my three dimes, 
And four is more than three! 

And i took the nickels to Hiram Coombs
Down at the seed-feed store, 
and the fool gave me five pennies for them, 
And five is more than four! 

And then i went and showed my dad, 
and he go red in the cheeks
And closed his eyes and shook his head-
Too proud of me to speak!